79. 3x Winner of the ASX Sharemarket Game | Chris Brycki

In by EquityMates4 Comments

“The best advice is boring..” – this is episode is anything but boring, AND is full of great advice.

Today we’re excited to bring you an interview with Chris Brykci. Chris is the CEO of StockSpot – Australia’s first ever digital investment adviser.

Chris has over 21 years of investment experience and spent most of his career as a Portfolio Manager at UBS. He holds a Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting/Finance Co-op Scholarship) from the UNSW and is a member of the ASIC Digital Advisory Committee.

Chris is a pioneer in the investment advice and personal finance space. He started Stockspot when he was 28 when he realised consumers were being taken advantage of by unfair fees and biased advice when they invest. He saw the opportunity to use technology to help more Australians access honest advice and low fee investing. He now sits on two ASIC financial advice and technology committees.

He’s also famous for winning the ASX high school share trading game three times as a teenager.
In this episode, we discuss a variety of investment topics, from investing 101 and creating a great portfolio to why it might not be the best idea for Bryce to be sitting in cash!

We learnt a lot from Chris, so we hope you do as well.

In this episode you will learn:

  • How Chris chose his first stock, at 10 years old
  • Why losing money is the best way to learn to invest
  • The strategies used to win 3 ASX School Sharemarket Games
  • The concept of ‘buying straw hats in winter’ and how you can apply it today
  • That ‘the best advice is boring’
  • What separates StockSpot from every other robo-adviser
  • The defensive strategies StockSpot use to protect investors money

Stocks and resources discussed:

Update: Some listeners asked for more detail on the newsletter, so this is what Chris responded with:

Re the newsletter. It was Joseph Granville’s newsletter in the 1970s. “Granville Market Letter, which thousands of investors relied on for stock-market advice”.

At the peak of his popularity in 1981, he had 16,000 subscribers paying him between $250 and $3,000 a year for his advice.

In Jan 1981 he made the call to ‘sell everything’.

Granville, who died in 2013, never managed to admit his error or reverse himself; he ended up being consigned to the dustbin of history, his track record in tatters. His newsletter -20% p.a. for 20 years..

Moral of the story? Fair value is an abstract concept, which stocks just wave hello to as they career past on their way toward becoming dirt cheap or wildly overvalued. I am hard-pressed to recall an extended period when stocks stayed at fair value for any appreciable period of time.

Reference: https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-01-07/be-smart-don-t-try-to-time-this-stock-market


Some housekeeping:

Follow us on Instagram – It’s not just memes, we’re actually using it as a platform to provide you with some inspiration and new concepts – each week we do a Pardon the Jargon (key terms you need to know as an investor), Company in the Spotlight (an introduction to a new Australian company), News and Thought Starters

Essential Learnings – we’ve collated all of our Basics 101 episodes into a series, so you can refer back to them, or use them as a starting point. They’re all essential episodes to learn to invest.

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Comments

  1. Hi,
    Can you confirm who the name of the stock tip newspaper (worst in history) that Chris Brycki talks about towards the end of the podcast please?
    Thanks,
    Rod

    1. Author

      Hi Rod – apologies, I was wrong. This just came through from Chris…

      Re the newsletter. It was Joseph Granville’s newsletter in the 1970s. “Granville Market Letter, which thousands of investors relied on for stock-market advice”.
      At the peak of his popularity in 1981, he had 16,000 subscribers paying him between $250 and $3,000 a year for his advice.
      In Jan 1981 he made the call to ‘sell everything’.
      Granville, who died in 2013, never managed to admit his error or reverse himself; he ended up being consigned to the dustbin of history, his track record in tatters. His newsletter -20% p.a. for 20 years..
      Moral of the story? Fair value is an abstract concept, which stocks just wave hello to as they career past on their way toward becoming dirt cheap or wildly overvalued. I am hard-pressed to recall an extended period when stocks stayed at fair value for any appreciable period of time.

      Reference: https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-01-07/be-smart-don-t-try-to-time-this-stock-market

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